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Table 5 Wald tests of differences by household type

From: Dissimilar occupations and marital stability

Divorce model interaction terms 1 2 3
Activities Distance 2 Earner 0.1621** 0.1740** 0.3400*
(.075) (.0749) (.1942)
1 Earner 0.1272 0.1965* 0.3869*
(.1063) (.1132) (.221)
Chi Squared 0.08 0.03 0.03
Knowledge Distance 2 Earner −0.1857*** −0.2056*** −0.3389**
(.0605) (.0609) (.1527)
1 Earner −0.1441 −0.1560 −0.2957
(.0937) (.091) (.2089)
Chi Squared 0.15 0.23 0.03
Sample 1 and 2 Earners Pooled 1 and 2 Earners Pooled Pooled, Non-Changers
Missing Occupation First Full Time Probabilistic Probabilistic
Household-Year Pairs 5210 5212 1081
Includes Controls Yes Yes Yes
Includes Occupation Indicators (Both Spouses) Yes Yes Yes
Log Likelihood −769.71 −770.96 −190.09
Pseudo R Squared 0.1190 0.1145 0.1897
  1. This table shows the marginal effects of the two significant distance measures by household type (single and dual earners). A positive marginal effect signifies an increased probability of dissolution. Both columns are derived from the estimates on Table 6, estimating marginal effects for the two groups using group-specific covariate means. The Chi Squared statistic tests the null hypothesis that both groups’ marginal effects are equal. Cluster (household) robust standard errors for the marginal effects in parentheses. The emphasis is on the non-significance of the Chi Squared statistics, which leads us to not reject the null hypothesis that distance has a common effect on marital stability for both types of households.